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Who is the Captain of the homicide division? I know Eve reports to Whitney

So, you'll have to forgive me a bit since this is a different software than the old site, and I haven't quite figured out how everything works...

A few of you have asked about spoiler tags, and they DO work, they just don't have their own easy button on the text editor. You can put them in manually, though, by using this code in your post:

Code:
[spoiler=title of spoiler]Here the content inside spoiler[/spoiler]

Just FYI.

If I figure out an easier way to do it, I will let you all know.

I can't remember what book it was, but the question was raised I think between Eve and Nadine (Roarke was present) and it was whether Roarke wore boxers or briefs and Roarke just shook his head in declining to answer and of course Eve wouldn't.

We find out in Secrets which one!

I don't know how to insert a block/spoiler or I would use it and state which one, at least in Secrets we know which one is the preferred Big Grin .

If this post is not in the right place, please move it or delete.  Thanks.

Show ContentSpoiler:

Since it's been awhile since anybody posted some obituaries here I figure I post the first ones on the new site.

Country Singers Don Williams and Troy Gentry dead at 78 and 50 respectively.

Don Williams: http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/20...dead-at-78

Don Williams, who began a long career in country music as a Nashville songwriter in the early 1970s and who entered the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2010, died today following a short illness at his home in Alabama, a publicist confirmed to NPR. He was 78.
Williams topped country charts with regularity through the '70s, in songs characterized by an easygoing, Sunday-afternoon air and delivered with a smooth voice that walked the seam of a porch-front baritone and stage-ready tenor. The sentiment that drove much of Williams' country was a rakish positivity, best remembered in his biggest song, 1981's "I Believe In You":
"Well, I don't believe that heaven waits / For only those who congregate / I'd like to think of God as love / He's down below / He's up above / He's watchin' people everywhere / He knows who does and doesn't care / And I'm an ordinary man / Sometimes I wonder who I am / But I believe in love."
Born in Texas in 1939, Williams began playing guitar as a teenager, and played in various groups around Portland, just across the bay from Corpus Christi. After a move to Nashville around 1969, Williams began penning songs for another country legend, "Cowboy" Jack Clement, and his newly formed JMI Records in 1971. Three years later, Williams was a recording artist in his own right, topping the country chart with "I Wouldn't Want to Live If You Didn't Love Me," properly kicking off his career and becoming a regular fixture on those charts from then on. (By 1980, his footprint had grown such that he played himself, and performed his own songs, in the Burt Reynolds vehicle Smokey and the Bandit II.)

In a statement on the news, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum CEO Kyle Young writes that "In giving voice to songs like 'Good Ole Boys Like Me,' 'Lord, I Hope This Day Is Good,' and 'Amanda,' Don Williams offered calm, beauty, and a sense of wistful peace that is in short supply these days. His music will forever be a balm in troublesome times."
It's true: In a time of volume and digital precision in music, Williams' smooth, salt-of-the-earth recordings are a respite. In early 2016, Williams announced it was "time to hang my hat up and enjoy some quiet time at home. I'm so thankful for my fans, my friends and my family for their everlasting love and support." Not more than a year later Williams' legacy spurred a tribute album, The Gentle Giant, featuring covers of his songs by Garth Brooks, Keb' Mo', Chris Stapleton and Trisha Yearwood, among others.
Williams is survived by his wife Joy, sons Gary and Timmy, three grandsons and one granddaughter.

Troy Gentry: http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/troy...d=49711197

Troy Gentry, one-half of the award-winning duo Montgomery Gentry, has died in a helicopter crash. He was 50 years old.

The duo's Twitter account posted the news Friday afternoon: "It is with great sadness that we confirm that Troy Gentry, half of the popular country duo, Montgomery Gentry, was tragically killed in a helicopter crash which took place at approximately 1:00 p.m. today in Medford, New Jersey."

I didn't see this posted anywhere else; if so, this can be continued there.

Who is your favorite character?

Mine is Mira. I've always appreciated the wisdom of people who have been in their fields for quite some time and know what they are talking about through and through.

I figure maybe have us a little fun and see if any of you could think of other media properties that could do well with the universe or if you want to get creatively crazy that's fine too. Basically name anything (book, TV, movie ET. AL.) and make an ideal plot out of it.

My ideal crossover for the In Death world would be none other than with Ghost in the Shell because of how closely related they are in terms of characters and timeline.

Plot: Eve and Peabody investigate a murder that was allegedly caused by a corrupt droid, only to find out that the droid is shaped like an adult female but talks like an 8-year old girl whose frightened out of her wits. Eve, Peabody and Roarke come to find out that the droid was an implanted ghost and ultimately linked to a case of child disappearances in Japan being actively investigated by Motoko Kusanagi and her team of Section 9. Eve is reluctant to team with Motoko and Section 9 at first but quickly warms up to them because of the similarities between her and Motoko when it comes to being a cop. Eventually Motoko and Eve recover the missing children after finding out that they'd been kidnapped by a sex trafficking group called Anemone.

So that's my ideal crossover, would love to hear yours.

Elyse over at the Smart Bitches website finally gave in and started reading the "In Death" series...starting with book #45: "Secrets in Death." Her review is amazing, and well worth a read.

http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/revie...h-jd-robb/

Lately I've been having an affinity for May-December romance books, mostly where there's a younger female and an older male and I distinctly remember one of you guys mentioning that Nora wrote one early in her career and I was interested in looking at it.

If any of you remember the title of the book I'd greatly appreciate it.

And I'm not talking about reading to your kids like either Dr. Seuss, The Polar Express or Harry Potter (what adult hasn't read Harry Potter).


I'm talking about reading other children's books that you normally don't read unless the story piqued your interest. I bring this up because on one of my usual browsings of GraphicAudio, I came across them listing a new novel by Brandon Sanderson called Alcatraz vs. The Evil Librarians. One look at the cover and the logo, this is the type of book that would be catered to middle schoolers.

Not just Sanderson, but we also have James Patterson, John Grisham and Julia Alvarez writing Children's Novels, and my curiosity is if any of you ever willfully read kid books if you found a good plot.